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Black Lives Matter: I CAN'T BREATHE

Black Lives Matter (BLM) is a political and social movement that protests against police brutality and violence towards black people.  In July 2013, the movement began with the use of the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter on social media after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of African-American teen Trayvon Martin 17 months earlier in February 2012.  The movement became nationally recognized for street demonstrations following the 2014 deaths of two African Americans, that of Michael Brown—resulting in protests and unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, a city near St. Louis—and Eric Garner in New York City.  Since the Ferguson protests, participants in the movement have demonstrated against the deaths of numerous other African Americans by police actions or while in police custody. Listed below is a shortlist of black men -- grandfathers, fathers, husbands, sons, and nephews -- that have died at the hands of the police and white supremacists in America. Patrick Lynn Warren Sr.,
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Happy Father's, Mother's, Sister's, Brother's, Son's, and Daughter's Day

Today is Father's Day in the US. And to celebrate it, my wife and kids got me 6 pairs of socks, 2 shirts, several packs of sour candies, a $25 Domino's Pizza gift card, and a mug emblazoned with the phrase "Good Man, Great Dad". I'll probably never use any of those things; they're all crappy IMHO. (Well, maybe I'll use the gift card and eat the candies; I love sour candies.) But this post isn't a Father's Day rant about the crappy gifts that men receive in comparison to women on Mother's Day; rather, it's about a conversation that I had with my son Kyle about why there isn't a Brother's or Sister's Day too. To quote him: "The world should really have a Brother's Day and a Sister's Day. If not, they should get rid of Mother's Day and Father's Day. I know it's traditional but It's really not fair."  Clearly, he felt left out! Not wanting to let a good opportunity to have an in depth conversation w

A better UI/UX for Cookie consent banners

I'm sure you've seen them before; those pesky, inescapable  Cookie consent banners !  They typically appear at the top or bottom of websites -- often obscuring important content.  For example, if you were to visit  CNN ,  Zara , or  Unicef  today; or, any other news, e-commerce, or charitable website for that matter -- especially those with an international presence -- you'd likely see one; a UI / UX eyesore.  Such Cookie consent banners, ubiquitous and omnipresent, have become the defacto solution for complying with an important part of the European Union's (EU) ePrivacy Directive  (ePD). If you're unfamiliar with the ePD, it basically mandates that websites first obtain a user's consent before storing and/or retrieving any Personally Identifiable Information  (PII) about them in and/or from HTTP cookies.  ( HTTP Cookies are small pieces of data stored by websites in a user's web browser for easier retrieval later.)  The Cookie Law, as the ePD has becom

Using HTML tables for website layout

I first became a front-end web developer in the year of our Lord, 1998.  Back then, the HTML specification had just reached version 4.0; Internet Explorer 7 was the dominant browser; and, the mantra of separation-of-concerns  was still being preached to web developers.  (Back then merely uttering the phrase CSS-in-JS  would've gotten you killed, professionally speaking.)  What's more, back then, HTML tables were still de rigueur; in fact, many websites used them for layout purposes ( DIV-itis hadn't caught on with the masses as yet; that would happen several years later.) Yes, it was the stone ages of the web -- in comparison to today.  Today, there's a wealth of newer technologies for developers to choose from when building websites, i.e. HTML5 , CSS4 , ES9 , etc.  Long gone is the mantra of separation-of-concerns and in its place sits CSS-in-JS, mockingly.  And, long gone are table-based layouts too; they gave way to the aforementioned DIV-itis phenomenon and t